Battlefield: 2042 Launch

    3SFG Launches Battlefield:2042 Area of Operation

     

     


      Awards

      Commendation Medals

      1. Medal of Valor

        History

        During the first year of the Civil War (1861–1865), a proposal for a battlefield decoration for valor was submitted to Lieutenant General Winfield Scott, the Commanding General of the United States Army, by Lieutenant Colonel Edward D. Townsend, an assistant adjutant at the Department of War and Scott's chief of staff. Scott, however, was strictly against medals being awarded, which was the European tradition. After Scott retired in October 1861, Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles adopted the idea of a decoration to recognize and honor distinguished naval service.[18]:18

        On December 9, 1861, Iowa Senator James W. Grimes, Chairman on the Committee on Naval Affairs,[19] submitted Bill S. 82 (12 Stat. 329–330)[20] during the Second Session of the 37th Congress, "An Act to further promote the Efficiency of the Navy". The bill included a provision (Chap. 1, Sec. 7) for 200 "medals of honor",[18]:13 "to be bestowed upon such petty officers, seamen, landsmen, and marines as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action and other seaman-like qualities during the present war, ..."[21] On December 21, the bill was passed and signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln. Secretary Welles directed the Philadelphia Mint to design the new military decoration.[22][23][24] On May 15, 1862, the United States Department of the Navy ordered 175 medals ($1.85 each) from the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia with "Personal Valor" inscribed on the back of each one.[25]

        On February 15, 1862, Senator Henry Wilson, the chairman of the Senate Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia, introduced a resolution for a Medal of Honor for the Army. The resolution (37th Congress, Second Session; Resolution No. 52, 12 Stat. 623–624) was approved by Congress and signed into law on July 12, 1862 ("A Resolution to provide for the Presentation of "Medals of Honor" to the Enlisted Men of the Army and Volunteer Forces who have distinguished, or may distinguish, themselves in Battle during the present Rebellion"). This measure provided for awarding a medal of honor "to such non-commissioned officers and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action and other soldier-like qualities during the present insurrection." During the war, Townsend would have some medals delivered to some recipients with a letter requesting acknowledgement of the "Medal of Honor". The letter written and signed by Townsend on behalf of the Secretary of War, stated that the resolution was "to provide for the presentation of medals of honor to the enlisted men of the army and volunteer forces who have distinguished or may distinguish themselves in battle during the present rebellion."[26][c] By mid-November the Department of War contracted with Philadelphia silversmith William Wilson and Son, who had been responsible for the Navy's design, to prepare 2,000 medals for the Army ($2.00 each) to be cast at the mint.[27] The Army's version had "The Congress to" written on the back of the medal. Both versions were made of copper and coated with bronze, which "gave them a reddish tint".[28][29]

        On March 3, 1863 Congress made the Medal of Honor a permanent decoration, and was authorized for officers of the Army.[30][31] On March 25, the Secretary of War presented the first Medals of Honor to six U.S. Army volunteers in his office.[32]

        In 1896, the ribbon of the Army's version of the Medal of Honor was redesigned with all stripes being vertical.[33] Again, in 1904 the planchet of the Army's version of the Medal of Honor was redesigned by General George Lewis Gillespie.[33] The purpose of the redesign was to help distinguish the Medal of Honor from other medals,[34] particularly the membership insignia issued by the Grand Army of the Republic.[35]

        In 1917, based on the report of the Medal of Honor Review Board, established by Congress in 1916, 911 recipients were stricken off the Army's Medal of Honor list because the medal had been awarded inappropriately.[36] Among them were William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody and Mary Edwards Walker. In 1977, Congress began reviewing numerous cases; it reinstated the medals for Cody and four other civilian scouts on June 12, 1989.[37][38] Walker's medal was restored in 1977.

        Prerequisites
        Conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. This member exhibits excellence in all proficiencies and leads by example inside and outside of combat. This ribbon may be awarded once.
      2. Distinguished Service Cross

        History

        The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the United States Army's second highest military award for soldiers who display extraordinary heroism in combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations, but which do not meet the criteria for the Medal of Honor. The Army Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy and Marine Corps' Navy Cross, the Air Force and Space Force's Air Force Cross, and the Coast Guard Cross. Prior to the creation of the Air Force Cross in 1960, airmen were awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

        The Distinguished Service Cross was first awarded during World War I. In addition, a number of awards were bestowed for actions which took place before World War I. In many cases, the medal was awarded to soldiers who had received a Certificate of Merit for gallantry; at the time, this certificate was the only other honor for gallantry the Army could present to combatants in lieu of a Medal of Honor. Others were furnished in belated recognition of actions which occurred in the Philippine–American War, during the Boxer Rebellion, and Pancho Villa Expedition.

        The Distinguished Service Cross is distinct from the Distinguished Service Medal, which is awarded to Army soldiers in recognition of exceptionally meritorious service to the government of the United States in a duty of great responsibility. The Distinguished Service Cross is only awarded for actions in combat, while the Distinguished Service Medal has no such restriction.

        Prerequisites
        The Distinguished Service Cross is awarded to 3SFG members for the display of extraordinary heroism in combat with an armed enemy force. 
      3. Distiguished Service Medal

        History
        The Distinguished Service Medal was authorized by Presidential Order dated 01-02-1918, and confirmed by Congress on 07-09-1918. It was announced by War Department General Order No. 6, 1918-01-12, with the following information concerning the medal: "A bronze medal of appropriate design and a ribbon to be worn in lieu thereof, to be awarded by the President to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Army shall hereafter distinguish himself or herself, or who, since 04-06-1917, has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility in time of war or in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United States." The Act of Congress on 07-09-1918, recognized the need for different types and degrees of heroism and meritorious service and included such provisions for award criteria. The current statutory authorization for the Distinguished Service Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3743.
        Prerequisites
        The Distinguished Service Medal is presented to a  3SFG soldier who has distinguished themselves by exceptionally meritorious service to the 3SFG in a duty of great responsibility. The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service that is clearly exceptional. The exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration.
      4. Silver Star Medal

        History

        The Silver Star Medal (SSM)[5] is the successor award to the "Citation Star" (3⁄16 silver star) which was established by an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918, during World War I. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the conversion of the "Citation Star" to the SSM with the original "Citation Star" incorporated into the center of the medal.

        Authorization for the Silver Star Medal was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the U.S. Navy on August 7, 1942, and an Act of Congress for the U.S. Army on December 15, 1942. The current statutory authorization for the medal is Title 10 of the United States Code, 10 U.S.C. § 3746 for the U.S. Army, 10 U.S.C. § 8746 for the U.S. Air Force, and 10 U.S.C. § 6244 for the U.S. Navy.

        The U.S. Army and Air Force award the medal as the "Silver Star". The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard continue to award the medal as the "Silver Star Medal". Since 21 December 2016, the Department of Defense (DoD) refers to the decoration as the Silver Star Medal.[5]

        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members of 3SFG for gallantry in action against an enemy of the 3rd Special Forces Group. This members also exhibits extreme excellence within their team both on and off the battlefield. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.
      5. Legion of Merit

        History

        The Legion of Merit (LOM) is a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The decoration is issued to members of the eight uniformed services of the United States[5] as well as to military and political figures of foreign governments.

        The Legion of Merit (Commander degree) is one of only two United States military decorations to be issued as a neck order (the other being the Medal of Honor), and the only United States military decoration that may be issued in degrees (much like an order of chivalry or certain Orders of Merit), although the degrees including a neck ribbon are only awarded to non-U.S. nationals.[6][7]

        The Legion of Merit is seventh in the order of precedence of all U.S. military awards and is worn after the Defense Superior Service Medal and before the Distinguished Flying Cross.[8] In contemporary use in the U.S. Armed Forces, the Legion of Merit is typically awarded to Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force general officers and colonels, and Navy and Coast Guard flag officers and captains occupying senior command or very senior staff positions in their respective services. It may also be awarded to officers of lesser rank, senior warrant officers (typically in command positions at the rank of chief warrant officer 5), and to very senior enlisted personnel (typically in the rank of command sergeant major and sergeant major of the Army in the Army, fleet master chief petty officer and master chief petty officer of the Navy in the Navy, chief master sergeant of the Air Force in the Air Force, and sergeant major of the Marine Corps in the Marine Corps), but these instances are less frequent, typically by exception, and the circumstances vary by branch of service.

        Authority to award the Legion of Merit is reserved for general officers and flag officers in pay grade O-9 (e.g. lieutenant general and vice admiral) and above, civilian Department of Defense personnel at assistant service secretary or Assistant Secretary of Defense level and above, or equivalent secretary-level civilian personnel with the Department of Homeland Security with direct oversight of the U.S. Coast Guard.

        On December 22, 2020, President Trump awarded the honour to three overseas political leaders, Scott Morrison, Prime Minister of Australia, India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi and former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe.[9]
         

        Following the invasion of North Africa in November 1942, a number of United States officers were awarded the Legion of Merit in the degree of Officer. (One of the recipients was future Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Lyman Lemnitzer. Soon after, regulations for the award of the Legion of Merit were revised so that it would not be awarded in the degrees above Legionnaire to United States military personnel.

        The Legion of Merit is similar to the French Legion of Honor in both its design, a five-armed cross, and in that it is awarded in multiple degrees. Unlike the Legion of Honor, however, the Legion of Merit is only awarded to military personnel. In addition, it is the only award in the world with multiple degrees of which the higher degrees cannot be awarded to citizens of the country of the award's origin.

        In October 1942, Brazilian Army Brigadier General Amaro Soares Bittencourt became the first person awarded the Legion of Merit (Commander) and a week later, Lieutenant, junior grade Ann A. Bernatitus, a U.S. Navy Nurse Corps officer, became the first member of the United States Armed Forces and the first woman to receive the Legion of Merit. She received the award for her service during the defense of the Philippines.[13] LTJG Bernatitus was also the first recipient of the Legion of Merit authorized to wear a Combat "V" with the medal.[14]

        General Dwight D. Eisenhower was presented the Legion of Merit by President Roosevelt while he was en route to the Tehran Conference, in Cairo, Egypt, on November 26, 1943. [15][16]

        In 1943, at the request of the Army Chief of Staff, General George C. Marshall, approval authority for U.S. personnel was delegated to the Department of War. Executive Order 10600, dated March 15, 1955, by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, again revised approval authority. Current provisions are contained in Title 10, United States Code 1121. As a result, awarding authority for the Legion of Merit resides with general officers/flag officers at the Lieutenant General / Vice Admiral level or higher.

        The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, unlike the Army and later the Air Force, provided for the Legion of Merit to be awarded with a "V" device indicating awards for participation in combat operations.

        From 1942 to 1944, the Legion of Merit was awarded for a fairly wide range of achievements. This was because it was, until the establishment of the Bronze Star Medal in 1944, the only decoration below the Silver Star which could be awarded for combat valor, and the only decoration below the Distinguished Service Medal which could be awarded for meritorious noncombat service.

        Prerequisites
        This medal is awarded to 3SFG personnel who exhibit exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. This is awarded once and restricted to the CCO
      6. Bronze Star Medal

        History

        Colonel Russell P. "Red" Reeder conceived the idea of the Bronze Star Medal in 1943; he believed it would aid morale if captains of companies or of batteries could award a medal to deserving people serving under them. Reeder felt another medal was needed as a ground equivalent of the Air Medal, and suggested calling the proposed new award the "Ground Medal".[18] The idea eventually rose through the military bureaucracy and gained supporters. General George C. Marshall, in a memorandum to President Franklin D. Roosevelt dated 3 February 1944, wrote

        "The fact that the ground troops, Infantry in particular, lead miserable lives of extreme discomfort and are the ones who must close in personal combat with the enemy, makes the maintenance of their morale of great importance. The award of the Air Medal has had an adverse reaction on the ground troops, particularly the Infantry Riflemen who are now suffering the heaviest losses, air or ground, in the Army, and enduring the greatest hardships."

        The Air Medal had been adopted two years earlier to raise airmen's morale. President Roosevelt authorized the Bronze Star Medal by Executive Order 9419 dated 4 February 1944, retroactive to 7 December 1941. This authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 3, dated 10 February 1944.

        President John F. Kennedy amended Executive Order 9419 per Executive Order 11046 dated 24 August 1962 to expand the authorization to include those serving with friendly forces. This allowed for awards where US service members become involved in an armed conflict where the United States was not a belligerent. At the time of the Executive Order, for example, the US was not a belligerent in Vietnam, so US advisers serving with the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces would not have been eligible for the award.

        Since the award criteria state that the Bronze Star Medal may be awarded to "any person ... while serving in any capacity in or with" the US Armed Forces, awards to members of foreign armed services serving with the United States are permitted. Thus, a number of Allied soldiers received the Bronze Star Medal in World War II, as well as UN soldiers in the Korean War, Vietnamese and allied forces in the Vietnam War, and coalition forces in recent military operations such as the Persian Gulf War, War in Afghanistan, and the Iraq War. A number of Bronze Star Medals with the "V" device were awarded to veterans of the Battle of Mogadishu.

        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members of 3SFG for heroic or meritorious achievement or service within the members team and to the unit itself on and off the battlefield. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.
      7. Meritorious Service Medal

        History

        At the Tri-Department Awards Conference (February 5, 1968), there was a discussion on the need for a third meritorious award to provide appropriate recognition for non-combat achievement or service comparable to that of the Bronze Star Medal for combat achievement or service. It was felt that the Legion of Merit's prestige was slipping because it was being used with increasing frequency to reward service below the Legion of Merit's intended standard, but higher than that required for the Commendation Medals of the various military services.[9]

        An ad hoc committee was formed by the Secretary of Defense (M&RA) to select a name. On November 8, 1968, the committee unanimously approved the name "Meritorious Service Medal". President Lyndon B. Johnson established the Meritorious Service Medal per Executive Order 11448, dated January 16, 1969. The Executive Order was amended by President Ronald Reagan per Executive Order 12312, dated July 2, 1981, to authorize award to members of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations.

        Prior to 2004, the MSM could only be awarded for peacetime service and could not be awarded in a combat zone, the MSM equivalent for those zones being the Bronze Star Medal (BSM). As in 1968 when the MSM was created, there were concerns that the prestige of the BSM was also slipping during combat operations in Southwest Asia that had essentially been continuous since 1990. In 2004, authority to award the MSM for combat zone service was authorized, retroactive to September 11, 2001.

        The medal was designed by Mr. Jay Morris of the Institute of Heraldry, and the design was approved by the committee on March 20, 1969. The ribbon design purposely follows the colors used for the Legion of Merit to reflect the parallel between the two medals. The eagle, symbol of the United States, stands on laurel branches denoting achievement. The star is used to represent the military service and the rays emanating therefrom denote the constant efforts of individuals to achieve through excellent and meritorious service.

        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members of 3SFG for outstanding meritorious achievement or service to the unit outside of combat. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.
      8. Air Medal

        History

        The Air Medal was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt on May 11, 1942. It was awarded retroactive to September 8, 1939, to anyone who distinguishes himself by meritorious achievement while serving with the Armed Forces in aerial flight.[5][6][7]

        The original award criteria set by an Army Policy Letter dated September 25, 1942, were for one award of the Air Medal:[8]

        per each naval vessel or three enemy aircraft in flight confirmed destroyed. An entire aircrew would be credited for the destruction of a ship, but only the pilot or gunner responsible would be credited for destroying an enemy aircraft.
        per 25 operational flights during which exposure to enemy fire is expected.
        per 100 operational flights during which exposure to enemy fire is not expected.


        These criteria were altered by the commanding generals of each numbered Air Force to fit the conditions of their theater of operations and to maintain morale. The Distinguished Flying Cross would usually be awarded for roughly twice to five times the requirements of the Air Medal. This led to automatic "score card" awards of the Air Medal and Distinguished Flying Cross for completing a set number of operational missions rather than distinguished service, meritorious action, or bravery, as had been intended. On August 5, 1943, such score card awards were officially abolished by a Headquarters Army Air Forces Awards Board memorandum due to the embarrassment when airmen received the Air Medal for "score carding" five missions or more but were later removed from flying duties for "lack of moral fibre". Commanders could still issue the awards on those grounds, but the recipient must perform exceptional or meritorious service as well.

        Prerequisites
        TBD
      9. Team Citation Medal

        History

        TBD

        Prerequisites
        The 3SFG ODA Citation is awarded to the members of a distinct ODA for valorous efforts and outstanding performance inside, and outside of the battlefield. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.
      10. Commanders Commendation Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members of 3SFG by the Company commander  for exemplary service to the unit inside and outside of the battlefield. This ribbon is awarded once.
      11. CNCOIC Commendation Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members by the company NCOIC to individuals or groups for exemplary service to the unit inside or outside of the battlefield. This ribbon is awarded once.
      12. Officer Excellence Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites

        Awarded to Officers who have gone above and beyond their line of duties and performed at a standard nothing short of outstanding. This ribbon is awarded once.

      13. NCO Excellence Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites

        Awarded to NCO's who have gone above and beyond their line of duties and performed at a standard nothing short of outstanding. This ribbon is awarded once.

      14. 3SFG Combat Action Medal

        History

        The Combat Action Ribbon (CAR), awarded to members of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard (when under the control of the Navy), is a military ribbon presented to those who have actively participated in ground or surface combat.

        The Combat Action Ribbon was first instituted on February 17, 1969 during the Vietnam War by Secretary of the Navy john H. Chafee. However, due to the signage of the Annual Defense Authorization Bill--Which was signed into law in October 1999 by President Bill Clinton--the Combat Action Ribbon was able to be awarded to members of the Navy or Marine Corps who served in combat after  December 6, 1941.

        Prerequisites
        The 3SFG Combat Action Medal is awarded for achievement in combat situations based on sustained performance or specific achievement of a superlative nature. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.
      15. 3SFG Achievement Medal

        History
        The 3SFG Achievement Medal inspired by the Army Achievement Medal

        The Achievement Medal is a military decoration of the United States Armed Forces. The Achievement Medal was first proposed as a means to recognize the contributions of junior officers[citation needed] and enlisted personnel who were not eligible to receive the higher Commendation Medal or the Meritorious Service Medal.

        Each military service issues its own version of the Achievement Medal, with a fifth version authorized by the U.S. Department of Defense for joint military activity. The Achievement Medal is awarded for outstanding achievement or meritorious service not of a nature that would otherwise warrant awarding the Commendation Medal. Award authority rests with local commanders, granting a broad discretion of when and for what action the Achievement Medal may be awarded.

        Prerequisites
        The 3SFG Achievement Ribbon is awarded for achievement in non-combat situations based on sustained performance or specific achievement of a superlative nature. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.
      16. Sisler Point Offense Medal

        History

        George K. Sisler served as a United States Army intelligence officer. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his valiant efforts during a pivotal attack in the Vietnam War. Surrounded and outnumbered, Sisler carried wounded men, called in airstrikes, and charged into enemy fire, all while coordinating and rallying his platoon. He was mortally wounded when single-handedly attacked an enemy position.

        George Sisler served as a United States Army intelligence officer. He was also famous for his toughness, once parachuting while having a broken bone. The ASU ROTC department’s Ranger Challenge team is named Sisler’s Raiders in his honor.

        Prerequisites

        Members of the 3SFG who in the face of imminent danger and as a multi or singular 3SFG squad have successfully attacked a prominent capture point or FOB on the battlefield under heavy enemy fire. This award is confirmed by members of the squad including the SL and highest ranking Officer/NCO on the server during the engagement. All recommendations will be handled according to reason for award and witness testimony. 

      17. Kedenburg Point Defense Medal

        History

        John J. Kedenburg was serving as a Specialist Five in the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. He was posthumously given the Medal of Honor for his self-sacrifice on June 14, 1968, in the Republic of Vietnam/Laos.

        Facing an onslaught from a much larger force, John Kedenburg voluntarily gave up the final spot on a helicopter to South Vietnamese soldiers. He ordered a full helicopter to leave and remained on the ground to fight approaching North Vietnamese troops, killing six until being overrun.

        John Kedenburg was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his self-sacrifice and bravery beyond the line of duty.

        Prerequisites

        Members of the 3SFG who in the face of imminent danger and as a multi or singular 3SFG squad(s) have successfully defended a prominent capture point or fob on the battlefield under heavy enemy fire. This award is confirmed by members of the squad including the SL and highest ranking Officer/NCO on the server during the engagement. All recommendations will be handled according to reason for award and witness testimony. 

      18. Irving Offensive Medal

        History
        Nicholas Irving for friends Irv and for all other Rangers, the Reaper is famous Army Ranger sniper who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a former member of the 3rd Ranger Battalion (75th Ranger Regiment). Through his career, he raised up to the rank of Sergeant and has become one of the most famous special operations snipers in the modern U.S. Military. During his active duty service, Nick Irving was deployed multiple times to Iraq and Afghanistan. He becomes widely know after his military record had 33 confirmed kills in a single deployment. He accomplished that while he was serving as a sniper and machine gunner in Afghanistan. He has become one of the deadliest Army Rangers in history.
        Prerequisites

        Members of the 3SFG who have exhibited exemplary K/D ratio's. A total of 33 kills (not downs) in a single game is required for recommendation. Members are recognized for their outstanding ability and havoc portrayed on the battlefield. This award is granted more than once. This award may only be given for kills involving the usage of small arms or .50 weapons.

      19. Combat Lifesaver Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members of 3SFG who in the face of imminent danger have risked life to save 30 or more lives successfully inside of combat. This award may be granted more than once.
      20. Fob Destroyer Medal

        History
        N/A
        Prerequisites

        Awarded to members of 3SFG who have destroyed 5+ enemy fobs in a single match. Granted to all individuals involved. This award may be earned more than once.

      21. "Nam Fratres Mei" Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites

        "For My Brothers" 

        Awarded to members of the 3rd Special Forces Group for exhibiting the brotherhood spirit the unit strives to hold itself to. This award is given to members who have gone above and beyond for their fellow soldier. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.

      22. Good Conduct Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members of 3SFG who have avoided conflict with NCO's and Officers alike, exhibit exceptional behavior, an outstanding activity record, and a willingness to learn and thrive within the unit. This ribbon is awarded more than once.

      Service Awards

      1. Longevity Service Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Awarded to members of the 3SFG who have completed a year of service to the unit. This ribbon may be awarded more than once.
      2. 3SFG Drill Master Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Members of 3SFG who hold the duty of lead instructor to the units IET & OTC courses. Recipients must be E-7+.
      3. Course Mastery Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites

        Awarded to members who have completed all required and optional trainings including IET & OTC, and all Aviation mandated trainings.

      4. Aviation Mastery Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Awarded to pilots for nothing short of exemplary piloting abilities. This pilot exhibits a willingness to train and instruct new pilots as well as continued dedication to enhancing their abilities in providing 3SFG ground forces with competent transportation quickly and effectively.
      5. OTC Completion Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites

        Awarded to members of 3SFG who have completed the OTC course to par.

      6. OCS Completion Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites

        Awarded to members who have completed Officer Candidate School and have received a commission.

      7. NCO Development Medal, NCODEV

        History
        The NCO Development Ribbon - Inspired by the The NCO Professional Development Ribbon

        The NCO Professional Development Ribbon (established in 1981) is issued by the U.S. Army for completion of any prescribed non-commissioned officer development courses. The first award of the NCO Professional Development Ribbon is issued for completion of the Basic Leader Course (BLC) (former titles of BLC include: the "Warrior Leader Course", "Primary NCO Course", "Combat Army Course", and the "Primary Leadership Development Course"). When a soldier completes additional schooling such as the Advanced Leaders Course (ALC), Senior Leaders Course (SLC), and Master Leader Course (MLC), an award numeral is worn on the ribbon to denote subsequent satisfactory completion of those courses (2, 3, & 4 respectively). Currently, the numeral "5" is authorized for graduation from the United States Army Sergeant Major Academy's 'Sergeants Major Course'. Graduates of the Battle Staff NCO Course, and the legacy First Sergeant Course, do not receive a numeral device for graduation from those courses. The highest numeral authorized for the NCO Professional Development Ribbon is "6" for graduates of the Nominative Leaders Course (NLC). NLC is a two week strategic leader development course designed to prepare nominative Command Sergeants Major (CSM) and Sergeants Major (SGM) for their duties as CSMs for commanders of 1-2 star Army commands, and Staff Section SGMs at HQDA level of responsibilities.
        Prerequisites
        The NCODEV ribbon is issued to members that have successfully completed Basic Leader Course(BLC) and have been promoted above the Rank of Corporal
      8. Aviation Service Medal

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        Awarded after the completion of flight school. Graduates must meet a standard of flight suitable for safe transportation and service to 3SFG ground forces.

      Campaign Medals

      1. Operation Phantom Fury Medal

        History

        The Second Battle of Fallujah—code-named Operation Al-Fajr (Arabic: الفجر "the dawn") and Operation Phantom Fury—was a joint American, Iraqi government, and British offensive in November and December 2004, considered the highest point of conflict in Fallujah during the Iraq War. It was led by the U.S. Marines against the Iraqi insurgents in the city of Fallujah and was authorized by the U.S.-appointed Iraqi Interim Government. The U.S. military called it "some of the heaviest urban combat U.S. Marines have been involved in since the Battle of Huế City in Vietnam in 1968."[18][19]

        This operation was the second major operation in Fallujah. Earlier, in April 2004, coalition forces fought the First Battle of Fallujah in order to capture or kill insurgent elements considered responsible for the deaths of a Blackwater Security team. When coalition forces fought into the center of the city, the Iraqi government requested that the city's control be transferred to an Iraqi-run local security force, which then began stockpiling weapons and building complex defenses across the city through mid-2004.[20] The second battle was the bloodiest battle of the entire Iraq War for American troops,[21] and is notable for being the first major engagement of the Iraq War fought solely against insurgents rather than the forces of the former Ba'athist Iraqi government, which was deposed in 2003.

        Prerequisites
        Participation in the 9.K Operation Phantom Fury Campaign

      Skill Badges

      1. 3SFG Long Tab

        History
        The 3SFG Long Tab inspired by the Special Forces Tab

        The Special Forces Tab is a service school qualification tab of the United States Army, awarded to any soldier completing the Special Forces Qualification Course[1] at the U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Soldiers who are awarded the Special Forces Tab are authorized to wear it and the green beret for the remainder of their military careers, even when not serving in a Special Forces command.[1][2]

        Prerequisites
        Awarded once a Soldier has completed all SF Training and has been on a selected ODA team for 30 days.  Training Requirement includes completion of 3SFG training pipeline and OTC.
      2. Expert Infantryman Badge

        History

        The Expert Infantryman Badge, or EIB, is a special skills badge of the United States Army. Although similar in name and appearance to the Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB), it is a completely different award. The CIB is awarded to infantrymen for participation in ground combat while the EIB is presented for completion of a course of testing designed to demonstrate proficiency in infantry skills.[2]

        The EIB was created with the CIB by executive order in November 1943 during World War II. Currently, it is awarded to U.S. Army personnel who hold infantry or special forces military occupational specialties with the exception of soldiers with the occupational specialty of Special Forces Medical Sergeant (18D). To be awarded the EIB, the soldier must complete a number of prerequisites and pass a battery of graded tests on basic infantry skills.

        Prerequisites
        Awarded for completion of SFPC, SFAS, and SFQC.
      3. Combat Infantry Badge (1st)

        History
        The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military decoration. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces soldiers in the rank of colonel and below, who fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an Infantry or Special Forces unit of brigade size or smaller at any time after 6 December 1941.
        Prerequisites

        - Must participate in x1 (Non-stacking with other CIB's) 3SFG Monthly Combat Deployment
        - Must perform duties to satisfaction
        - Must be engaged in ground combat during the duration of the deployment
        - Must be actively participating in ground combat during the duration of the deployment

      4. Combat Infantry Badge (2nd)

        History
        The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military decoration. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces soldiers in the rank of colonel and below, who fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an Infantry or Special Forces unit of brigade size or smaller at any time after 6 December 1941.
        Prerequisites
        - Must participate in x2 (Non-stacking with other CIB's) 3SFG Monthly Combat Deployment
        - Must perform duties to satisfaction
        - Must be engaged in ground combat during the duration of the deployment
        - Must be actively participating in ground combat during the duration of the deployment
      5. Combat Infantry Badge (3rd)

        History
        The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military decoration. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces soldiers in the rank of colonel and below, who fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an Infantry or Special Forces unit of brigade size or smaller at any time after 6 December 1941.
        Prerequisites
        - Must participate in x3 (Non-stacking with other CIB's) 3SFG Monthly Combat Deployment
        - Must perform duties to satisfaction
        - Must be engaged in ground combat during the duration of the deployment
        - Must be actively participating in ground combat during the duration of the deployment
      6. Combat Infantry Badge (4th)

        History
        The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military decoration. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces soldiers in the rank of colonel and below, who fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an Infantry or Special Forces unit of brigade size or smaller at any time after 6 December 1941.
        Prerequisites
        - Must participate in x4 (Non-stacking with other CIB's) 3SFG Monthly Combat Deployment
        - Must perform duties to satisfaction
        - Must be engaged in ground combat during the duration of the deployment
        - Must be actively participating in ground combat during the duration of the deployment
      7. Combat Medical Badge (1st)

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD
      8. Combat Medical Badge (2nd)

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD
      9. Combat Medical Badge (3rd)

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD
      10. Combat Medical Badge (4th)

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD
      11. Army Aviator Badge

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD
      12. Army Senior Aviator Badge

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD
      13. Army Master Aviator Badge

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD
      14. US Army Recruiter Badge

        History
        TBD
        Prerequisites
        TBD

      Other Medals

      1. Combat Action Medal (9.K)

        History
        The medal was initiated by then minister of defense Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg and introduced by the President of Germany, Christian Wulff in 2010. The initiation of the medal took place against the backdrop of more and more German soldiers being involved in combat situations while participating in missions abroad, especially in Afghanistan. Prior to the establishment of the Combat Action Medal, achievements and services rendered in combat were only recognized by the awarding of the German Armed Forces Deployment Medal. The criteria for that award is primarily time spent in the theatre, so there is no distinction whether a soldier was deployed as a member of a staff or if he was deployed as part of combat troops, actively participating in battles. In 2011, the medal was awarded to a non-German soldier for the first time.
        Prerequisites
        Awarded for demonstrating exemplary performance while engaging the enemy (Awarded by the Command of 9.K).